Alum News: Katherine Barymow (Arch. ’17)

Head shot of Kathering Barymow

Katherine Barymow (Arch. ’17) is pursuing graduate studies at Yale University where she is concurrently enrolled in the Master of Architecture II (Post-Professional) degree and the Middle Eastern Studies Graduate Certificate of Concentration programs. The Master of Architecture II is an accelerated graduate program for professional Bachelor of Architecture degree holders who are interested in gaining a broader understanding of issues in architecture theory, technology and history. On the other hand, the Middle Eastern Studies program provides Katherine with an opportunity to develop a more in-depth understanding of the region’s political and social affairs, as well as gain some language proficiency.

A Robert W. Cutler scholar, Katherine credits the Honors program for providing her with an environment where she was able to pursue her academic interests in seemingly disparate, yet related academic fields. She was a double major in Architecture and Political Science and completed honors capstone projects in both majors. Her political science project was a historical chronology of events describing the narrative of American-Syrian relations from the Truman era through 2016, while the architecture project examined the potential city-scale and building-scale solutions to the rehabilitation of Syrian communities along the Euphrates River. Working on these projects, as well as other Honors requirements, were instrumental in preparing Katherine for graduate school.

“Honors classes were very similar to graduate school classes, in that they challenged us not only to engage with substantial material and texts, but also to think critically about that information and consider new applications of existing knowledge. This creative space is not unlike the challenges posed in graduate studios and seminars, where every experience, whether it be a success or failure, is a step forward in academic research.”

Katherine has fond memories of her experience as an undergraduate at SU and the support she received from faculty. Her advice to current and future Honors students is to take advantage of the resources that the program offers, and not to be afraid to pursue their academic interests and passions.

“It truly is the case that you can do anything you set your mind to, especially in Honors, if you are willing to work hard and go out of your way to draw on connections with faculty in your field. … The amount of support and advice I received was truly astounding, making it a truly exciting and fulfilling experience.”